It’s Getting Hot in Here: Summer Safety Tips

Ah, summer. Warm weather, sunshine and dehydration? While the summer months can be great, there are safety precautions that should come with the rising temperatures, especially if you’re working with air compressors.

Heat illness can happen to anyone as a result of environmental or personal risk factors. Follow these simple tips to stay healthy on the job:

  • You’ve heard it a million times, but it’s true. Drink water and lots of it. That means at least one cup every 15-20 minutes. If you’re working in an already hot space with too little ventilation, don’t work through dehydration.
  • Give yourself a break. Work is important, but so is your health. Spend some time in the shade or a cool area and out of the sun, especially if you’re working somewhere like an auto-shop without air conditioning. This will allow your body to cool down and rest.
  • Are you working on a construction site in direct sunlight? Cover up and use sunscreen. While the sun serves as a great source of Vitamin D, it’s important to monitor your UV exposure. Remember, UV rays are most intense between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Don’t dismiss heat illness symptoms. Educate yourself about dangerous warning signs to look out for:

Heat exhaustion warning signs:

  • Faint or feel dizzy
  • Sweat excessively
  • Skin turns pales and feels cool to the touch/clammy
  • Feel nauseous or vomit
  • Pulse is fast but weak
  • Muscle cramps

If you experience heat exhaustion, rest in a cool area, use a cold compress or take a cool shower, and drink ample amounts of water.

Heat stroke warning signs:

  • Intense, throbbing headache
  • No sweat
  • Skin is red, hot and dry
  • Body temperature rises above 103°
  • Feel nauseous or vomit
  • Pulse is fast and strong
  • Lose consciousness

If you are caring for someone who had a heat stroke, call 9-1-1 immediately and try to cool them off as quickly as possible.

How are you and your team staying safe this summer? Let us know in the comments below. Make sure you never miss a post by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

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